Tag archives for PIC16F

Introduction to Programming Microcontrollers with Flowcode V6

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Flowcode is one of the World’s most advanced graphical programming languages for microcontrollers. It allows you to create complex microcontroller applications with advanced peripheral interfacing which make it easy to connect wide range of devices such as switches, LCD displays, analogue sensors, SD cards, Real time clocks, RS232/RS485, GPS, GSM, Bluetooth and so on by just dragging and dropping icons onto a flowchart. No prior knowledge of programming is required to start this course but a basic knowledge of PIC microcontrollers is necessary. In this article we are going to get a quick introduction to Flowcode v6.

Interfacing SD Card With PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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A memory card (also called a flash memory card) is a solid-state electronic data storage device used for storing digital information. They are commonly used in many electronic devices, including digital cameras, mobile phones, laptop computers, MP3 players and also in many applications where a large amount of data has to be stored either once or continuously like in data loggers. Memory cards are small, re-writable and are able to retain data without power. In this article we will learn how to interface an SD Card with a PIC Microcontroller with SPI bus to write and read to/from an SD card with MPLAB XC8 and MPLAB Code Configurator.

PIC Microcontroller Interrupts – XC8

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Interrupts are one of the most powerful features of PIC Microcontrollers, interrupts make it possible to create applications that can respond to external stimulus in real time. An interrupt is basically an event that requires the microcontroller to stop normal program execution and then to jump to execute a program code related to the event causing the interrupt. An interrupt requires immediate attention, only once the microcontroller will finish executing the interrupt code, then it can go back to continue with the main program. The interrupt code is called Interrupt Service Routine (ISR) or Interrupt Handler. In this article we're gonna learn how to implement Interrupts using Microchip XC8 compiler.

PIC Microcontroller Interrupts – MikroC

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Interrupts are one of the most powerful features of PIC Microcontrollers, interrupts make it possible to create applications that can respond to external stimulus in real time. An interrupt is basically an event that requires the microcontroller to stop normal program execution and then to jump to execute a program code related to the event causing the interrupt. An interrupt requires immediate attention, only once the microcontroller will finish executing the interrupt code, then it can go back to continue with the main program. The interrupt code is called Interrupt Service Routine (ISR) or Interrupt Handler. In this article we're gonna learn how to implement Interrupts using MikroC Pro for PIC compiler.

PIC Microcontroller Communication with I²C Bus – XC8

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The I²C or Inter-Integrated Circuit is a serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s) over only two wires. The devices don't have to be identical as long as they support I²C protocol. In our illustration, the first device with address 1 is a digital temperature sensor, the second one is a real time clock and the third one is a serial LCD display and the bus could carry on even more devices. Communication takes place from the master (PIC) to the individual selected slave only as shown in this illustration. Configuration with PIC18F Peripheral Libraries and MPLAB Code Configurator are discussed in this article

Interfacing LCD Display With PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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LCDs are alphanumeric (or graphical) displays, which are frequently used in microcontroller based applications which require some information to be displayed to the user. There are many devices in the market which come in different shapes and sizes. Some LCDs have 40 or more character lengths with the capability to display several lines. Some other LCD displays can be programmed to display graphic images. Some modules offer color displays, while some others incorporate back lighting so that they can be viewed in dimly lit conditions. In this tutorial we will learn how to connect an LCD to any PORT of a microcontroller, display characters and send commands to LCD using lcd library with MPLAB Code Configurator and PIC18F Peripheral Libraries.