Tag archives for PWM

MPLAB® Code Configurator

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The MPLAB® Code Configurator (MCC) is a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) plug-in tool for MPLAB® X IDE which generates easy to understand C code that is inserted into an MPLAB® X project, based on the settings peripherals configurations and selections made in the Graphical User Interface (GUI). The generated code can be used in any application program. When starting out with a new project using Microchip 8-bit microcontrollers, setup of the configuration and all the peripherals can be time consuming, especially for new projects. The MPLAB® Code Configurator simplifies this down to a series of simple graphical selections from the menus within the MCC.

DC Motor Speed Control using PWM of PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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DC motors are used in many industrial, commercial, and domestic applications. We have DC motors in toys, irrigation pumps, robotics, Drills and in many applications. In real life applications turning a motor ON in clockwise or anticlockwise directions or turning it OFF is not always all that is required. The speed of rotation has to be controlled as well. In this article, we are going to learn how to control the speed of a DC motor using the Pulse Width Modulation of a PIC Microcontroller with MPLAB Code Configurator

Interfacing DC Motor with PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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DC motors are used in many industrial, commercial, and domestic applications. We have DC motors in toys, irrigation pumps, robotics, Drills and in many applications. In this article, we are going to learn how to interface a DC motor with a PIC Microcontroller, rotating it in either the clockwise or anticlockwise direction using MPLAB XC8 Compiler.

DC Motor Speed Control using PWM of PIC Microcontroller – mikroC

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DC motors are used in many industrial, commercial, and domestic applications. We have DC motors in toys, irrigation pumps, robotics, Drills and in many applications. In real life applications turning a motor ON in clockwise or anticlockwise directions or turning it OFF is not always all that is required. The speed of rotation has to be controlled as well. In this article, we are going to learn how to control the speed of a DC motor using the Pulse Width Modulation of a PIC Microcontroller using mikroC Pro for PIC.

Interfacing DC Motor with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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DC motors are used in many industrial, commercial, and domestic applications. We have DC motors in toys, irrigation pumps, robotics, Drills and in many applications. In this article, we are going to learn how to interface a DC motor with a PIC Microcontroller, rotating it in either the clockwise or anticlockwise direction using mikroC Pro for PIC Compiler

Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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Pulse width modulation (PWM) is a technique of controlling the amount of power delivered to an electronic load by switching ON and OFF a digital signal. This is the simplest technique that can be used to produce analog voltages from a digital one. The fraction of the period for which the signal is ON to the total period is known as the duty cycle. The average DC value of the signal can be varied by varying the duty cycle. The duty cycle can be anywhere between 0 (signal is always off) to 1 (signal is constantly on). Suppose, if the signal has +5 V while it is ON and 0 V during OFF condition, then by changing the duty cycle of the signal, the amount of energy transferred to device can be varied. This method is commonly used for controlling speeds of DC motors, brightness of lamps, Sine wave inverters, Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) etc.

Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) with PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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Pulse width modulation (PWM) is a technique of controlling the amount of power delivered to an electronic load by switching ON and OFF a digital signal. This is the simplest technique that can be used to produce analog voltages from a digital one. The fraction of the period for which the signal is ON to the total period is known as the duty cycle. The average DC value of the signal can be varied by varying the duty cycle. The duty cycle can be anywhere between 0 (signal is always off) to 1 (signal is constantly on). Suppose, if the signal has +5 V while it is ON and 0 V during OFF condition, then by changing the duty cycle of the signal, the amount of energy transferred to device can be varied. This method is commonly used for controlling speeds of DC motors, brightness of lamps, Sine wave inverters, Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) etc.