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Archives for November, 2013

Interfacing 7-Segment Display With PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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The 7-segment display is the earliest type of an electronic display that uses 7 LEDs bars arranged in a way that can be used show the numbers 0 - 9. (actually 8 segments if you count the decimal point, but the generic name adopted is 7-segment display.) These devices are commonly used in digital clocks, electronic meters, counters, signalling, and other equipment for displaying numeric only data. It is not different from an LED in terms of interfacing, by turning the appropriate segments ON and OFF we can display easily the numbers 0 to 9 and optionally the decimal point (DP). The segments of the displays are normally referred to by letters ‘a’ to ‘g’. In this article we are going to learn how to interface a single 7-Segment display with PIC Microcontroller using MPLAB XC8 compiler.
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PIC Microcontroller Communication with RS232 Serial Bus – MikroC

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RS232 serial communication is one of the oldest communication where data is sent or received one bit at a time. This protocol can easily be used to communicate between a PC and various devices supporting this type of protocol like PIC microcontrollers, GPS, GSM modem etc. While other interfaces like Ethernet, FireWire, and USB all send data as a serial stream, the term "serial port" usually identifies hardware more or less compliant to the RS-232 standard, intended to interface with a modem or with a similar communication device. MikroC Pro for PIC
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Multiplexing of 7-Segment Displays with PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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The 7-segment display is the earliest type of an electronic display that uses 7 LEDs bars arranged in a way that can be used show the numbers 0 - 9. (actually 8 segments if you count the decimal point, but the generic name adopted is 7-segment display.) These devices are commonly used in digital clocks, electronic meters, counters, signalling, and other equipment for displaying numeric only data. It is not different from an LED in terms of interfacing, by turning the appropriate segments ON and OFF we can display easily the numbers 0 to 9 and optionally the decimal point (DP). The segments of the displays are normally referred to by letters ‘a’ to ‘g’. In this article we are going to learn how to multiplex two or more 7-Segment displays to be able to display numbers higher than 9. MPLAB XC8 compiler is used in this tutorial.

Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) with PIC Microcontroller – XC8

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Pulse width modulation (PWM) is a technique of controlling the amount of power delivered to an electronic load by switching ON and OFF a digital signal. This is the simplest technique that can be used to produce analog voltages from a digital one. The fraction of the period for which the signal is ON to the total period is known as the duty cycle. The average DC value of the signal can be varied by varying the duty cycle. The duty cycle can be anywhere between 0 (signal is always off) to 1 (signal is constantly on). Suppose, if the signal has +5 V while it is ON and 0 V during OFF condition, then by changing the duty cycle of the signal, the amount of energy transferred to device can be varied. This method is commonly used for controlling speeds of DC motors, brightness of lamps, Sine wave inverters, Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) etc.

PIC Microcontroller Communication with SPI Bus – MikroC

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The SPI or Serial Peripheral Interface is a synchronous serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s). There are many devices that support the SPI protocol and can easily communicate with a microcontroller via SPI: A/D converters, D/A converters, SD Cards, DS1306 Real Time Clocks, MAX7219 serial display drivers, 25LC256 Serial EEPROM, etc. The devices dont have to be identical as long as they support SPI protocol. MikroC Pro for PIC

PIC Microcontroller Communication with I2C Bus – MikroC

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The I2C or Inter-Integrated Circuit is a serial communication and allows multiple devices to communicate with a micocontroller(s) over only two wires. The devices don't have to be identical as long as they support I²C protocol. Communication takes place from the master (PIC) to the individual selected slave only as shown in this illustration, the master sends data to the slave address 2 only. I²C with MikroC Pro for PIC

Interfacing Matrix Keypad with PIC Microcontroller – MikroC

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Keypads are small keyboards that are used to enter numeric, alphanumeric or select configuration data to microcontroller systems. Keypads are available in a variety of sizes. The common sizes are 3x3, 4x3 and 4x4 keypads. A matrix keypad is basically a combination of push-buttons in a way to form rows and columns. In this way the number of input/output pins necessary for their connection to a microcontroller is reduced. A 4x3 keypad requires 7 input/output pins instead of 12 and a 4x4 will require 8 input/output pins instead of 16 pins. Keypad is a widely used input device with lots of application in our everyday life: Telephone, ATM, electronic lock, Calculator, Industrial process, Timers etc. In this article, we are going to learn how to interface a matrix keypad with an LCD display using MikroC Pro for PIC compiler.